Birding Hot Spots


Birding Hot Spots
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Central Oklahoma
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Eagle Lake

by Jimmy Woodard

Eagle Lake is in Del City a few blocks east of the intersection of Bryant and Reno Avenues. This lake was formerly called Thompson Lake but Del City changed the name in 2000. It is an old sand pit that stays filled with water.

Ebird shows a list of 81 species have been found here since 2015. The entrance is well signed but hard to find as there is a row of business along the north side of Reno. You have to keep an eye out for the sign. Turn north into the park. There is ample parking and restrooms. The park is mostly open with a few scattered trees. There is a gravel trail heading west around the west end of the lake. There is a line of trees following along a railroad track. The trees curve north and then continue along the north end. This line of trees is the best area to look for birds. At the far west end of the lake, a paved trail cuts thru the trees and winds along Crooked Oak Creek which runs into the Oklahoma(Canadian) River. A pedestrian bridge goes over the creek and runs west along the south bank of the river underneath I-40. This trail runs a mile to MLK Boulevard and the Indian Cultural Museum. Watch for birds along the river and the grassy margins.

There is access to the river from the park and trails. There is also a line of trees along the north side of the river which has produced a few birds like Pileated Woodpecker.

This checklist is generated with data from eBird (ebird.org), a global database of bird sightings from birders like you. 
Waterfowl
Snow Goose
Canada Goose
goose sp.
Muscovy Duck (Domestic type)
Blue-winged Teal
Northern Shoveler
Gadwall
Mallard
Mallard (Domestic type)
Green-winged Teal
Grebes
Pied-billed Grebe
Pigeons and Doves
Rock Pigeon
Eurasian Collared-Dove
Mourning Dove
Nightjars
Common Nighthawk
Swifts
Chimney Swift
Rails, Gallinules, and Allies
American Coot
Shorebirds
Killdeer
peep sp.
Spotted Sandpiper
Gulls, Terns, and Skimmers
Ring-billed Gull
Cormorants and Anhingas
Double-crested Cormorant
Herons, Ibis, and Allies
Great Blue Heron
Great Egret
Snowy Egret
Little Blue Heron
Cattle Egret
Vultures, Hawks, and Allies
Turkey Vulture
Red-shouldered Hawk
Red-tailed Hawk
Kingfishers
Belted Kingfisher
Woodpeckers
Red-bellied Woodpecker
Downy Woodpecker
Pileated Woodpecker
Northern Flicker
Falcons and Caracaras
American Kestrel
Tyrant Flycatchers: Pewees, Kingbirds, and Allies
Least Flycatcher
Eastern Phoebe
Western Kingbird
Eastern Kingbird
Scissor-tailed Flycatcher
Jays, Magpies, Crows, and Ravens
Blue Jay
American Crow
Martins and Swallows
Northern Rough-winged Swallow
Barn Swallow
Cliff Swallow
Tits, Chickadees, and Titmice
Carolina Chickadee
Tufted Titmouse
Wrens
House Wren
Carolina Wren
Bewick’s Wren
Kinglets
Ruby-crowned Kinglet
Thrushes
Eastern Bluebird
American Robin
Catbirds, Mockingbirds, and Thrashers
Gray Catbird
Brown Thrasher
Northern Mockingbird
Starlings and Mynas
European Starling
Wagtails and Pipits
American Pipit
Waxwings
Cedar Waxwing
Finches, Euphonias, and Allies
House Finch
American Goldfinch
New World Sparrows
Field Sparrow
Dark-eyed Junco
White-crowned Sparrow
Harris’s Sparrow
White-throated Sparrow
Savannah Sparrow
Song Sparrow
Lincoln’s Sparrow
Spotted Towhee
sparrow sp.
Blackbirds
Western Meadowlark
Eastern Meadowlark
Baltimore Oriole
Red-winged Blackbird
Brown-headed Cowbird
Rusty/Brewer’s Blackbird
Common Grackle
Great-tailed Grackle
Wood-Warblers
Orange-crowned Warbler
Nashville Warbler
Common Yellowthroat
Yellow-rumped Warbler
Cardinals, Grosbeaks, and Allies
Northern Cardinal
Painted Bunting
Old World Sparrows
House Sparrow