Birding Hot Spots


Birding Hot Spots
Use the main menu list for a guide to birding locations in Central Oklahoma.

Date Guide to the Occurrences of Birds in Oklahoma

Birding Checklists

Central Oklahoma
Bird Checklist

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Helpful Online Resources

September 2016

Migration Surprises

Several rare and hard to identify species were reported during the month beginning with the Common Tern first reported on July 29 by Cameron Carver at the John Marshall School Pond. During September one was repeatedly reported at the Lake Hefner canal and then T K found one at Lake Thunderbird. Other interesting shorebirds were found passing

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April 2017

Busy Birding

What a busy month with so many new species arriving in the Central Oklahoma area, while resident birds are building nests and raising young. There are too many interesting sightings to include in the report. Payne, Oklahoma and Cleveland counties have reported 200+ species for the year.

On March 31 Zach Poland located a Clay-colored Sparrow at

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February 2017

The Great Backyard Bird Count

What a busy birding month!! This year the Great Backyard Bird Count (GBBC) dates were 17, 18, 19, 20 and Central Oklahoma did well, but were we able to have all central Oklahoma counties participate?

The GBBC was quickly followed by the arrival of the first spring migrants, and two surprise visitors arrived during

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April 2017

7700 Club

WOW !!  What a busy month.  Birds were migrating and birders were busy recording their visits to Central Oklahoma.  Also at the end of a monumental journey Larry Mays became the third person in Oklahoma to join the 7700 club by seeing 100 bird species in all 77 counties.  Congratulations!!!   But he didn’t stop there.  This month

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January 2017

The New Year

Starting the 2017 New Year during January, bird reports were entered into eBird from all Central Oklahoma counties with 3 of them reporting over 100 species.  Cleveland County had their Christmas Bird Count on the 1st and many birders in other counties started the year with a day of birding. Meanwhile, the drought continues in central

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October 2016

When Out Looking

Sometime bird reports are on the verge of Ripley’s Believe it or Not.  In October a Magnificent Frigatebird was spotted on Lake Yahola near Tulsa, Northern Saw-whet Owls were captured in Cherokee County and in November in Blaine County just looking up at a flock of Sandhill Crane flying overhead a Whooping Crane was identified.  One

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November 2016

 A warm fall

The warm fall weather continued in November which helped delay the winter migrants.  Still many interesting shore birds and sparrows were discovered and Red-breasted Nuthatches were popping up in various locations.  Will these species still be here for the winter Christmas Bird Counts?

October 30th Jimmy Woodard documented a Cape May Warbler at Meeker Lake in

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December 2016

The End of the Year

December was a busy month with Christmas Bird Counts all over the state.  Even so birders had time to find new birds in several of the central Oklahoma Counties.  According to eBird at the end of the year four counties had reported over 200 species, another five had over 100 species, 2 had over

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March 2017

Early Spring

Now is the time to be alert.  Migrants are arriving in central Oklahoma; sometimes several new ones in a single day.  The drought continued with wild fires in the state; however, by the end of the month some rain arrived, but much more is needed.  It appears the last frost for Oklahoma City was on the 15th,

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May 2017

Busy Birders

The last of the spring migrants and summer residents arrived during May and birdwatchers were busy observing them in all the central Oklahoma counties.  In fact, birders were so busy, all counties increased their species count for the year; some dramatically.  Only three counties are left with under a hundred species reported while three other counties are

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